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New York Wildlife Viewing Guide: Where to Watch Wildlife (Watchable Wildlife Series) - Discover the Hidden Gems and Hotspots of NY's Wildlife


Here is the outline of the article: # New York Wildlife Viewing Guide: Where to Watch Wildlife (Watchable Wildlife Series) Books PDF File - Introduction - What is the Watchable Wildlife Series and why it is useful for wildlife enthusiasts - What are some of the benefits of wildlife viewing for people and nature - How to use this guide to plan your wildlife viewing trips in New York - Section 1: Wildlife Viewing Tips and Ethics - How to prepare for your wildlife viewing adventure (equipment, clothing, safety, etc.) - How to find and observe wildlife without disturbing them or their habitats - How to respect the rights and privacy of landowners and other visitors - How to report wildlife sightings and contribute to citizen science projects - Section 2: New York State Birding Trail - What is the New York State Birding Trail and how it showcases the diversity of birdlife in the state - How to access the trail and find information on birding locations, events, and resources - A brief overview of some of the featured birding regions and sites in New York City, Long Island, Hudson Valley, Catskills, Adirondacks, Finger Lakes, Western New York, and more - Section 3: Watchable Wildlife Sites by Region - A detailed description of each of the 112 watchable wildlife sites in New York, organized by region - For each site, information on location, directions, accessibility, facilities, fees, seasons, hours, contact information, website, and map - For each site, a list of the wildlife species that can be seen there, with photos and brief descriptions - For each site, suggestions on what to do and see there, such as hiking trails, scenic views, educational programs, etc. - Section 4: Wildlife Species Profiles - A comprehensive guide to the wildlife species that can be found in New York, organized by taxonomic groups (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, insects) - For each species, information on identification, distribution, habitat, behavior, diet, conservation status, and threats - For each species, tips on where and when to see them in New York - Conclusion - A summary of the main points and takeaways from the article - A call to action for readers to explore New York's wildlife and support conservation efforts - A thank you note and a request for feedback - FAQs - A list of five frequently asked questions about New York wildlife viewing and their answers Here is the article based on the outline: # New York Wildlife Viewing Guide: Where to Watch Wildlife (Watchable Wildlife Series) Books PDF File Are you a wildlife lover who wants to discover the amazing diversity of animals that live in New York? Do you want to learn more about the natural history and ecology of the state and its regions? Do you want to have fun and memorable experiences while observing wildlife in their natural habitats? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you need to get your hands on the New York Wildlife Viewing Guide: Where to Watch Wildlife (Watchable Wildlife Series) books PDF file. This guidebook is part of the Watchable Wildlife Series, a collection of books that spotlight unique locations throughout North America where travelers can see wildlife. The series is produced by Watchable Wildlife Incorporated, a nonprofit organization that promotes wildlife viewing as a way to connect people with nature and foster conservation awareness. The New York Wildlife Viewing Guide covers 112 sites across the state where you can watch wildlife ranging from mammals and birds to reptiles and insects. It provides detailed information on each site's location, directions, accessibility, facilities, fees, seasons, hours, contact information, website, and map. It also lists the wildlife species that can be seen there, with photos and brief descriptions. And it offers suggestions on what to do and see there, such as hiking trails, scenic views, educational programs, and more. In this article, we will give you an overview of what this guidebook has to offer, and how you can use it to plan your wildlife viewing trips in New York. We will also share some tips and ethics for wildlife viewing, and introduce you to some of the featured sites and species in the book. By the end of this article, you will be ready to embark on your own wildlife adventure in New York! ## Wildlife Viewing Tips and Ethics Before you head out to explore New York's wildlife, there are some things you need to know and do to make your experience enjoyable, safe, and respectful. Here are some tips and ethics for wildlife viewing: - Prepare for your wildlife viewing adventure. Make sure you have the right equipment, clothing, and safety gear for your trip. Some of the essential items include binoculars, camera, field guide, map, compass, water, snacks, sunscreen, insect repellent, first aid kit, and appropriate clothing and footwear for the weather and terrain. You may also want to check the weather forecast, road conditions, and site regulations before you go. - Find and observe wildlife without disturbing them or their habitats. The best way to see wildlife is to be patient, still, and quiet. Avoid sudden movements and noises that may scare them away or stress them out. Keep a safe distance from wildlife and never approach, feed, touch, or harass them. Use binoculars or a zoom lens to get a closer look. Stay on designated trails and roads and do not trample or damage vegetation or other natural features. Do not collect or remove any plants, animals, rocks, or other objects from the site. - Respect the rights and privacy of landowners and other visitors. Many of the wildlife viewing sites in New York are located on private or public lands that are managed by different agencies or organizations. Always follow the rules and regulations of the landowner or manager and obtain permission before entering private property. Do not trespass or litter on any land. Be courteous and considerate of other visitors and do not interfere with their enjoyment of the site. Share your sightings and experiences with others in a friendly and respectful manner. - Report wildlife sightings and contribute to citizen science projects. Your wildlife observations can help scientists and conservationists monitor and protect wildlife populations and habitats in New York. You can report your sightings to various databases and websites, such as eBird, iNaturalist, DEC Wildlife Sightings, NY Herp Atlas, NY Breeding Bird Atlas, NY Dragonfly & Damselfly Survey, NY Butterfly & Moth Survey, NY Bumble Bee Atlas, and more. You can also participate in citizen science projects that involve collecting data or samples for research purposes, such as Project FeederWatch, Christmas Bird Count, FrogWatch USA, Monarch Watch, Bee Watchers, and more. ## New York State Birding Trail If you are a birdwatcher or a bird lover, you will be thrilled to know that New York has a state birding trail that showcases the diversity of birdlife in the state. The New York State Birding Trail was launched in October 2021 by the DEC (Department of Environmental Conservation) as a way to highlight world-class birding opportunities across the state and provide information on places anyone can go to find birds amid beautiful settings. The trail is not a physically connected or built trail, but a network of promoted birding locations that can be accessed by car or public transportation, providing an inclusive experience for all. The trail covers nine regions in the state, each with its own distinctive bird communities and habitats. The regions are: - New York City - Long Island - Hudson Valley - Catskills - Capital District - Adirondacks - Central New York - Finger Lakes - Western New York Each region has a number of featured birding sites that offer exceptional opportunities to see a variety of birds throughout the year. Some of these sites are also included in the New York Wildlife Viewing Guide, while others are new additions to the trail. For each site, you can find information on location, directions, accessibility, facilities, fees, seasons, hours, contact information, website, and map. You can also find a list of the birds that can be seen there, with photos and brief descriptions. To access the trail and find information on birding locations, events, and resources, you can visit the DEC website or download the free GoOutdoorsNY app. You can also follow the DEC on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube for updates and announcements. The New York State Birding Trail is a great way to discover the amazing avian diversity of New York and enjoy the beauty of nature. Whether you are a beginner or an expert birder, you will find something to suit your interests and abilities on the trail. So grab your binoculars and field guide, and get ready to explore New York's feathered friends! ## Watchable Wildlife Sites by Region York, let's take a closer look at some of the watchable wildlife sites that are featured in the New York Wildlife Viewing Guide. The guidebook organizes the sites by region, so you can easily find the ones that are near you or your destination. Each region has its own unique wildlife and habitats, so you can expect to see different animals and plants depending on where you go. Here are some examples of the regions and sites that you can explore in New York: ### New York City You may think that New York City is all about skyscrapers and traffic, but the truth is that the city is home to a surprising variety of wildlife and green spaces. The city has more than 1,700 parks and playgrounds, covering about 14 percent of its land area. These parks provide habitat for hundreds of bird species, as well as mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and insects. Some of the best places to watch wildlife in New York City are: - Central Park: This iconic park in the heart of Manhattan is a birdwatcher's paradise, especially during spring and fall migration seasons. You can see more than 200 bird species here, including warblers, thrushes, woodpeckers, hawks, owls, and waterfowl. The park also has other wildlife attractions, such as turtles, frogs, squirrels, raccoons, bats, and butterflies. You can explore the park's many trails, ponds, meadows, gardens, and monuments on foot or by bike. - Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge: This refuge is part of the Gateway National Recreation Area and is located in Queens and Brooklyn. It is one of the most important urban wildlife habitats in North America, protecting more than 9,000 acres of salt marshes, islands, uplands, and open water. It is a haven for more than 330 bird species, including shorebirds, waders, raptors, songbirds, and waterfowl. You can also see other animals such as horseshoe crabs, diamondback terrapins, muskrats, and seals. You can enjoy the refuge's trails, boardwalks, observation platforms, visitor center, and programs. - Pelham Bay Park and Orchard Beach: This park is located in the Bronx and is the largest park in New York City, covering more than 2,700 acres. It offers a diverse range of habitats and wildlife, such as forests, meadows, wetlands, salt marshes, islands, beaches, and rocky shores. You can see more than 200 bird species here, including ospreys, egrets, herons, gulls, terns, ducks, geese, and swans. You can also see other animals such as deer, coyotes, foxes, skunks, rabbits, and snakes. You can enjoy the park's trails, picnic areas, playgrounds, golf courses, horseback riding, and swimming. ### Catskills The Catskills are a mountainous region in southeastern New York that covers more than 6,000 square miles. They are known for their scenic beauty and outdoor recreation opportunities. The region has a rich biodiversity and hosts many rare and endangered species. Some of the best places to watch wildlife in the Catskills are: - Hunter-West Kill Wilderness Area: This wilderness area is part of the Catskill Park and covers more than 19,000 acres of rugged terrain. It is home to some of the highest peaks in the Catskills, such as Hunter Mountain and West Kill Mountain. You can see many wildlife species here, such as black bears, bobcats, fishers, porcupines, beavers, otters, minks, and weasels. You can also see many bird species here, such as bald eagles, peregrine falcons, boreal chickadees, golden-crowned kinglets, and winter wrens. You can enjoy the wilderness area's trails, campsites, views, and waterfalls. - Mongaup Valley Wildlife Management Area: This wildlife management area covers more than 13,000 acres of land along the Mongaup River and its reservoirs. It is a designated Bird Conservation Area and an Important Bird Area by Audubon New York. It is a hotspot for bald eagles, especially in winter when they congregate near the open water. You can see more than 20 eagles here on a good day. You can also see other bird species here, such as ospreys, merlins, common loons, hooded mergansers, and common goldeneyes. You can enjoy the wildlife management area's trails, observation blinds, boat launches, and fishing access. - Sam's Point Preserve: This preserve is part of the Minnewaska State Park Preserve and covers more than 5,000 acres of land on the Shawangunk Ridge. It is one of the best examples of a ridgetop dwarf pine barrens ecosystem in the world. It is home to many rare and endangered plants and animals, such as pitch pine, scrub oak, blueberry, huckleberry, prairie warbler, golden-winged warbler, timber rattlesnake, and bog turtle. You can also see spectacular natural features here, such as Sam's Point, Lake Maratanza, Ice Caves, and Verkeerderkill Falls. You can enjoy the preserve's trails, visitor center, picnic areas, snakes. Some of the most fascinating and diverse reptiles in New York are: - Common Snapping Turtle: This is the largest turtle in New York, weighing up to 35 pounds and measuring up to 20 inches in shell length. It has a dark brown or black shell with a serrated edge and a long tail with spikes. It has a powerful jaw and a hooked beak that can inflict a painful bite. It lives in freshwater habitats such as ponds, lakes, rivers, and marshes. It is omnivorous, eating plants, fish, frogs, birds, mammals, and carrion. It hibernates in mud or water in winter. It is the official state reptile of New York. - Eastern Box Turtle: This is a small terrestrial turtle with a high-domed shell that can close tightly to protect itself from predators. It has a brown or black shell with yellow or orange markings and a yellow or orange head with dark spots. It lives in woodlands, fields, and wetlands. It is omnivorous, eating plants, fruits, mushrooms, insects, worms, slugs, and snails. It can live up to 100 years or more. It is listed as a species of special concern in New York. - Timber Rattlesnake: This is one of the three venomous snakes in New York and one of the most dangerous animals in the state. It can grow up to 6 feet long and weigh up to 4 pounds. It has a brown or black body with dark crossbands and a rattle at the end of its tail. It lives in rocky areas, forests, and swamps. It is carnivorous, eating rodents, rabbits, squirrels, birds, and other snakes. It hibernates in dens with other snakes in winter. It is listed as a threatened species in New York. ### Amphibians New York has more than 30 amphibian species, including frogs, toads, salamanders, and newts. Some of the most colorful and distinctive amphibians in New York are: - Red-Spotted Newt: This is a small salamander with a complex life cycle that involves three stages: larva, eft, and adult. The larva is aquatic and has gills and a finned tail. The eft is terrestrial and has bright orange skin with red spots. The adult is aquatic again and has olive-green skin with red spots. It lives in ponds, lakes, streams, and forests. It is carnivorous, eating insects, worms, crustaceans, mollusks, and fish eggs. It secretes toxins from its skin to deter predators. - Spring Peeper: This is a tiny frog that can fit on a dime. It has brown or gray skin with a dark X-shaped mark on its back. It lives in woodlands, wetlands, and fields. It is insectivorous, eating ants, beetles, flies, spiders, and other small prey. It makes a loud peeping call that can be heard from miles away in spring when it breeds in temporary pools. - American Bullfrog: This is the largest frog in North America, weighing up to 1 pound and measuring up to 8 inches in body length. It has green or brown skin with dark spots and a yellow belly. It lives in permanent freshwater habitats such as ponds, lakes, rivers, and marshes. It is carnivorous, eating anything it can fit in its mouth, such as fish, frogs, turtles, snakes, birds, mammals, and even other bullfrogs. It makes a deep bellowing call that sounds like "jug-o-rum". ## Conclusion We hope you enjoyed this article about the New York Wildlife Viewing Guide: Where to Watch Wildlife (Watchable Wildlife Series) books PDF file. This guidebook is a valuable resource for anyone who loves wildlife and nature, and wants to explore the amazing diversity of animals that live in New York. It provides detailed information on where to go, what to see, and how to watch wildlife responsibly and ethically. It also provides comprehensive profiles of the wildlife species that can be found in New York, with photos and descriptions. If you are interested in getting this guidebook, you can download it for free from the Watchable Wildlife Incorporated website. You can also order a printed copy for $19.95 plus shipping and handling. You can also find other guidebooks in the Watchable Wildlife Series that cover other states and regions in North America. We hope this article inspired you to go out and discover New York's wildlife and support conservation efforts. New York is home to some of the most beautiful and unique creatures on earth, and they deserve our respect and protection. Thank you for reading and happy wildlife viewing! ## FAQs Here are some frequently asked questions about New York wildlife viewing and their answers: - Q: What is the best time of year to watch wildlife in New York? - A: The best time of year to watch wildlife in New York depends on what you want to see and where you want to go. Generally, spring and fall are good seasons for birdwatching, as many migratory birds pass through the state. Summer is a good season for seeing reptiles, amphibians, insects, and flowers. Winter is a good season for seeing mammals, especially those that are active in the snow, such as deer, coyotes, foxes, and otters. - Q: What are some of the best places to watch wildlife in New York City? - A: Some of the best places to watch wildlife in New York City are Central Park, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Pelham Bay Park and Orchard Beach, Prospect Park, and Inwood Hill Park. These places offer a variety of habitats and wildlife species, such as birds, turtles, snakes, frogs, squirrels, raccoons, bats, and butterflies. - Q: What are some of the rarest or endangered wildlife species in New York? - A: Some of the rarest or endangered wildlife species in New York are the Indiana bat, the Karner blue butterfly, the bog turtle, the eastern massasauga rattlesnake, the piping plover, the golden-winged warbler, the Bicknell's thrush, and the spruce grouse. These species face threats such as habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, pollution, invasive species, disease, climate change, and human disturbance. - Q: What are some of the ways to help protect and conserve wildlife in New York? - A: Some of the ways to help protect and conserve wildlife in New York are to support local and national organizations that work for wildlife conservation, such as Watchable Wildlife Incorporated, Audubon New York, The Nature Conservancy, The Wildlife Conservation Society, and The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. You can also volunteer for wildlife monitoring or restoration projects, donate money or resources to wildlife causes, adopt or sponso


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